Recipes

Invented recipes

Stuffed mushrooms

These mushrooms are barbecue compatible (just put a tin foil on top while barbecuing on medium heat) and can also be eaten cold.
temperature for the barbecue should be so, that you can only hold you hand over the heat for 3 seconds

(amounts are gut feeling, so I cannot tell)
mushrooms, big

for the stuffing:
rosemary
garlic
whisky
honey
balsamic cream
salt and pepper
cheese (parmesan, feta, gruyere or whatever tasty thing there is), grinded
olive oil

– remove “stems” from mushrooms and chop finely
– mix chopped stems with everything and add a bit of whisky
– stuff into mushrooms
– approx 20 min at 200°C in oven
– (you can add before finished a layer of cheese on top and some more balsamic cream)

 

Sheep Cheese

This is also barbecue compatible (just put a tin foil on top while barbecuing on medium heat for a long time approx 1h) and can also be eaten cold.
temperature for the barbecue should be so, that you can only hold you hand over the heat for 3 seconds

(amounts are gut feeling, so I cannot tell)
1 feta block ca 250 g (make sure that you have real sheep cheese)

oregano
basil
thyme
salt and pepper
olive oil
2 garlic
1 large onion
1-2 peppers (red, green, yellow)
4 small tomatoes
olives

– put oil in heatproof pot and add thee cheese block
– add salt, pepper and the herbs
– press garlic onto the feta and distribute evenly on the cheese
– add finely sliced onion (half-) rings
– add chopped olives, peppers and tomatoes
– add again salt, pepper, herbs
– approx 45 min or longer at 200°C in oven / on barbecue

Chinese Cooking

I like Chinese cooking, and I admire the cooking style and stories associated with different recipes collected by Fuchsia Dunlop. She is my hero. I can advice to anyone who is interested in Chinese cooking to buy all of her books. Worth it.

Some tips:

  • get a simple steel or iron wok. no need for something fancy (make sure to season the wok). See entry ‘The Wok’
  • if you do not have a gas stove, you would want to get one of the portable induction plates (e.g. Tillreda from IKEA). works really nicely with fine-tuning the heat
  • finding a good chili bean paste is difficult, but at ‘Sous Chef‘ you get the best one and many other nice things
  • key is good rice. Best buy some “fragrant rice” at your local Asia market
  • a rice cooker saves a lot of stress and the rice turns out always delicious

The Wok

The basic thing you have to have for Chinese cooking is the wok. No need for something fancy. Just a Carbon Steel or Iron Wok for around 15-20 € would do.

You find a selection at the Wokshop (shop in San Francisco, but they ship everywhere), just to have an idea.

You would want to avoid the ones with wooden handles though. It looks nice, but the wood will burn and fall off and without handles the wok will be pretty hard to use. Does not matter if the iron or heat-resistant plastic handles get hot.

Also, 14′ (inches) is pretty good size in my experience. The shape of the bottom is also important and depends if you use an electric, induction or gas stove.

For more info, check here on the wokology 101.

For cleaning, NEVER use detergent. Use just a sponge, no metal scrub.

egg-plant stir fry (2-3 persons)

Recipe not in the books of Fuchsia Dunlop:

(“tastes just like my mother would cook it” was the verdict of a Chinese friend)

500g (~2 egg-plants)
100 ml (Groundnut-) Oil
300 ml Water
1 free chilli (red)
2 Garlic
3 TBSP Dark soy sauce
1 TBSP Sugar

(everything on quite high flame)
– put oil into wok and bring to smoke (slightly)
– add chopped garlic and chilli until fragrant, but take care not to burn them
– add bite-sizes chopped egg-plants after short time
– wait until all oil soaked up
– add repeatedly 1 TBSP of the water and wait until soaked up to add the next
– do so until only half of water left (150 ml)
– add soy sauce and sugar to the left-over water, mix and put completely to the egg-plants
– wait until it looks “soaked enough”